Film Macro Lens on Digital

When my mother in law decided she’d stopped photography I aquired her stuff, a pair of film Canon EOS 500s with assorted lenses, including a Sigma 90mm macro lens. I’m a regular digital Canon shooter and so I naturally wanted to try this out on my digital bodies (I decided to use my 450d, not my 6d as a test bed for this). However, despite fitting nicely, every time I tried to take a photo I got a lens connection error and, however diligently I cleaned the terminals, the error persisted. Occasionally I’d have another go, only to have the same result. However, for some reason my duckduckgo fu (I refuse to use Google) went transendental, or I used slightly different language, not sure which, but I found that all film vintage EF lenses were interchangable with digital bodies *apart from some Sigma lenses* due to a slight mismatch in the electronics. There were suggestions of how to take it apart and solder in new chips, or of paying other folks to do it, neither of which appealed. So I left it.

Then, in the middle of the night as sometimes happens I wondered if the secret was just to put some tape over the contacts, that way the camera wouldn’t think it had a lens at all and might work. Then to my surprise, when I did some digging I found this video in which the presenter does just that. But I sat there this morning, methodically put tape over the contacts on the lens, put it on the body and….it worked. Joy unconfined and all that.

Ok, caveat time, I’m not saying to do this. Just because he does it and it works and I did it and it worked, doesn’t mean it will for you.

So today I’ve been, in between working at home due to the lockdown, popping out into the garden and seeing what happens. Broadly the results a good, but a couple of things did prove challenging. The first is that with no communication between the camera and the lens, the autofocus doesn’t work. My eyesight isn’t great and I find using the camera with glasses tricky, so I got a lot of out of focus photos, especially with the very small depth of field. Also the lens has no manual stop down, or it’s fixed at 2.8, I don’t know. However as I didn’t have a light meter with me there was a lot of exposure guesswork. But I got results which I liked. Not sure if I’m going to be doing a lot of this, macro isn’t really an area I’ve ever got into in a big way, though the bokeh is amazing and I might want to explore the lens a bit for for non-macro shooting. 90mm is a fairly useful short telephoto in it’s own right.

So, as is traditional, here are a couple of images. One is your genuine macro type shot of an Acer leaf just coming through, and the other is a telephoto distance shot of our Art Nouveau planter.

3 thoughts on “Film Macro Lens on Digital

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